books: mystery

The Secret of Nightingale Wood by Lucy Strange (9+ years)

1919. Mama is ill. Father has taken a job abroad. Nanny Jane is too busy to pay any attention to Henrietta and the things she sees – or thinks she sees – in the shadows of their new home, Hope House. All alone, with only stories for company, Henry discovers that Hope House is full of strange secrets: a forgotten attic, ghostly figures, mysterious firelight that flickers in the trees beyond the garden. One night she ventures into the darkness of Nightingale Wood. What she finds there will change her whole world …

If you liked this book, you may also like: Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce


Murder Most Unladylike
 by Robin Stevens (9+ years)

18070753When Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong set up a secret detective agency at Deepdean School for Girls, they can’t find a truly exciting mystery to solve (unless you count The Case of Lavinia’s Missing Tie. Which they don’t). Then Hazel discovers the body of the Science Mistress, Miss Bell – but when she and Daisy return five minutes later, the body has disappeared. Now the girls have to solve a murder, and prove a murder happened in the first place, before the killer strikes again (and before the police get there first, naturally). But will they succeed? And can their friendship stand the test?

If you liked this book, you may also like: The Malory Towers books by Enid Blyton

 

The Mystery of The Jewelled Moth by Katherine Woodfine (9+ years)

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Wonder at the puzzling disappearance of the Jewelled Moth! Marvel as our heroines, Sophie and Lil, don cunning disguises, mingle in high society and munch many cucumber sandwiches to solve this curious case! Applaud their bravery as they follow a trail of terrible secrets that leads straight to London’s most dangerous criminal mastermind, and could put their own lives at risk . . . It will be the most thrilling event of the season!

If you liked this book, you may also like: The Clockwork Sparrow by Katherine Woodfine

 

Frost Hollow Hall by Emma Carroll (9+ years)

urlWinter 1881. In the middle of a frozen lake, a girl is skating. She’s not supposed to be here. No one is. Not since Kit Barrington drowned at Frost Hollow Hall ten years ago. But the dead don’t scare Tilly Higgins. This ice is thin. It cracks. Suddenly she’s under the water, drowning. Near death, a strange spirit appears to her, a boy so beautiful Tilly’s sure he’s an angel. But he’s a ghost. A very troubled ghost. And he desperately needs her help…

If you liked this book, you may also like: Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken

 

The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd (8+ years)

91WmZYcds9L._SL1500_Ted and Kat watch their cousin, Salim, get on board the London Eye. The pod rises and then thirty minutes later it lands.  But Salim is nowhere to be seen. The police are baffled and it’s up to Ted, whose brain runs on its own unique operating system, and his sister, Kat, to follow a trail of clues across London to bring Salim back.  An unputdownable thriller with a hero who lives on far beyond the last pages of the book.

If you liked this book, you may also like: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

 

She Is Not Invisible by Marcus Sedgwick (12+ years)

She is not inLaureth Peak’s father is a writer. For years he’s been trying, and failing, to write a novel about coincidence. His wife thinks he’s obsessed, Laureth thinks he’s on the verge of a breakdown. He’s supposed to be doing research in Austria, so when his notebook shows up in New York, Laureth knows something is wrong. On impulse she steals her mother’s credit card and heads for the States, taking her strange little brother Benjamin with her. Reunited with the notebook, they begin to follow clues inside, trying to find their wayward father. Ahead lie challenges and threats, all of which are that much tougher for Laureth than they would be for any other 16-year old. Because Laureth Peak is blind.

If you liked this book, you may also like: Wonder by RJ Palacio.

 

Who Framed Klaris Cliff? by Nikki Sheehan (10+ years)

51ryIgY3tQLPeople used to call them ‘friends’ and said how they were good for your brain. And then a day came when all that changed… When they became the enemy. Now, anyone found harbouring a rogue imaginary person is in for the COSH – an operation that fries your imagination and zaps whatever’s in there, out of existence. That’s why I wish Klaris Cliff had never shown up and why I know that proving her innocence is that last hope I have of saving myself.

If you liked this book, you may also like: Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

 

 

The Sally Lockhart quartet by Philip Pullman (9+ years)

rubyWhen a man dies after hearing the question, ‘Ever heard the phrase The Seven Blessings?’, Sally Lockhart flings herself into a desperate adventure that will expose the deepest secrets of the corrupt and murderous opium trade.  Orphaned and alone, Sally must unearth the rotten heart of the mystery where the deadly secret of the ruby in the smoke lies.  Another feisty heroine thrown into a dark and mysterious plot.  First book in the quartet: The Ruby in the Smoke.  Fantastic from start to finish.

If you liked these books, you may also like: Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge.

 

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon (12+ years)

curiousChristopher is fifteen years old and has Asperger’s Syndrome.  He knows a very great deal about maths and very little about human beings. He loves lists, patterns and the truth.  And so when he finds his neighbour’s dog murdered with a garden fork, he sets out on a terrifying journey which will turn his whole world upside down.  Fascinating, funny and sad.  But most of all – real.

If you liked this book, you may also like: The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd

MOONTRUG’S ALTOCUMULUS TOWER

fantasy

real life

dystopias

mystery

humour

war

adventure

 ‘Reading stays with you until the very end – after Narnia is gone, Lord Voldemort is defeated and Alice is awake…’ (Anonymous)

2 thoughts on “books: mystery

  1. Pingback: 'Murder Most Unladylike' by Robin Stevens | moontrug

  2. Pingback: Who Framed Klaris Cliff? | moontrug

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